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Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: S/HE IS HER/E

An exhibit I would love to see at the Andy Warhol Museum (June 15-September 15)

H/er first solo museum exhibition, S/HE IS HER/E, will showcase the breadth of P-Orridge’s art practice through over 100 works, dating from the mid 1970s to the present.  With an art practice dating back to the late 1960s, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge has reinvented and reintroduced h/erself as groundbreaking performance artist, pioneer of industrial music, “wrecker of civilization”, essayist, and, most recently, as pandrogyne. H/er singular and, at times, provocative creative practice has exerted a profound influence on visual artists and musicians alike.  Genesis has performed in a number of music projects including Throbbing Gristle, Psychic TV and Pigface.  A central focus for the exhibition is the Pandrogyne project – a complex and highly ambitious series of collaborative artworks by P-Orridge and his wife Lady Jaye Breyer P-Orridge (1969-2007).  Frustrated by what they considered to be socially imposed limits on personal identity and on the language of true love, P-Orridge and Lady Jaye sought to merge their two identities, using plastic surgery, hormone therapy, cross-dressing, and altered behavior to create the pandrogynous being, “Breyer P-Orridge.” An act of love, the work explores how fully two people can integrate their lives, bodies, and consciousnesses. Lady Jaye passed away in 2007, and the project continues with Genesis embodying the entirety of Breyer P-Orridge.


Read more at warhol.org: 
http://www.warhol.org/webcalendar/event.aspx?id=17081

I want to see this exhib @ sfMoMA (via toryburch)!
Garry Winogrand
Street-style photographer before there was a thing called street style. A new retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art spotlights his striking images of everyday postwar America.
Woman Riding Bicycle, 1975 by Garry Winogrand; used with Permission © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco View high resolution

I want to see this exhib @ sfMoMA (via toryburch)!

Garry Winogrand

Street-style photographer before there was a thing called street style. A new retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art spotlights his striking images of everyday postwar America.

Woman Riding Bicycle, 1975 by Garry Winogrand; used with Permission © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

THIERRY COHEN

Darkened Cities' series by Thierry Cohen

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French photographer, Thierry Cohen, has blended city scenes—shot & altered to eliminate lights & other distractions—& the night skies from less populated locations that fall on the same latitudes.  So Paris gets the stars of northern Montana, New York those of the Nevada desert (a Burning Man sky over NYC…how incredible!).

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The result is what city dwellers might see in the absence of light & pollution.  

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Cohen’s work will be exhibited at the Danziger Gallery in NYC in March.

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The loss of starry skies, accelerated by worldwide population growth in cities, has created an urbanite who “forgets & no longer understands nature.”

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"To show him stars is to help him dream again."

See more HERE via the New York Times Magazine.

Mickalene Thomas ‘Origin of the Universe’ at Brooklyn Museum

A few shots from a fantastic exhibit (thru January 20) I saw in November at the Brooklyn Museum:

Brooklyn artist Mickalene Thomas is best known for her elaborate, collage-inspired paintings, embellished with rhinestones, enamel, and colorful acrylics. Her depictions of African American women explore a spectrum of black female beauty and sexual identity while constructing images of femininity and power. Origin of the Universe, Thomas’s first solo museum exhibition, highlights recent bodies of work that examine interior and exterior environments in relation to the female figure. Their settings are often inspired by her 1970s childhood.

Thomas’s production is informed by the classical genres of portraiture, landscape, still life, and the female nude. She combines careful borrowings from historical painting with contemporary popular culture, taking cues from such artists as Romare Bearden, Gustave Courbet, David Hockney, Édouard Manet, and Henri Matisse. In combining traditional genres with African American female subjects, Thomas makes a case for opening up the conventional parameters of art history and culture. Among the pieces on view are contemporary riffs on Courbet’s Origin of the World and Manet’s Le Dejeuner sur l’herbe. Seventy-five of the ninety featured works were added for the Brooklyn presentation. An entrance-gallery mural, a film about Thomas’s mother, and installations of furnished domestic interiors were created specifically for this show.

Quite literally, the origin of the universe.

Imagines of the artist’s mother

Cindy Shermen @ MoMA

February 26 - June 11, 2012

Bringing together more than 170 photographs, this retrospective survey traces the artist’s career from the mid 1970s to the present. More info HERE.

DAVID HOCKNEY: A BIGGER PICTURE A RETROSPECTIVE AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY

London’s Royal Academy of Arts is kicking off the new year with a major exhibition of landscape art by David Hockney, all inspired by his native Yorkshire. 

For many years, England’s most famous living artist was a California resident. But in 2005, with a milestone birthday (his 70th) on the horizon, David Hockney returned to Bridlington, the town of his childhood, and began one of the most prolific periods of his career. With the wooded landscape of East Yorkshire as his inspiration, Hockney set about painting his environs on a monumental scale and in brilliant, psychedelic color.

In January, the Royal Academy will pay tribute to his landscapes with a retrospective titled David Hockney RA: A Bigger Picture. In addition to showcasing Hockney’s recent work (some paintings were only completed months ago), the exhibition will also feature his photocollages from the 1980s and his Grand Canyon paintings from the 1990s, as well as recent drawings made using the iPhone and iPad — showcasing his nimbleness between artistic media and penchant for experimentation. For art lovers, the show is sure to be a highlight of 2012.

David Hockney RA: A Bigger Picture at the Royal Academy is on view January 21 through April 9, 2012. Advanced booking is recommended.

Courtesy of Tablettalk.com

Visual AIDS

GO SEE: “POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE”

Where: Cheim & Read - 547 W 25th ST. New York, NY

When: Saturday, January 7: 10a - 6 pm / Sunday, January 8: 12 - 4p

What: “Postcards From the Edge” offers a unique opportunity for buyers to acquire original, postcard-sized artwork at an…

(Source: artelierllc)

Alice in Wonderland @ The Tate Liverpool
November 4, 2011 - January 29, 2012
http://www.tate.org.uk/
More info HERE

Alice in Wonderland @ The Tate Liverpool

November 4, 2011 - January 29, 2012

http://www.tate.org.uk/

More info HERE

Carsten Holler @ the New Museum

Dying to go!  Sounds like an incredible experience.

goseenow:

Carsten Holler | Experience | New Museum | October 26 - January 15

Take your pick, but sign your waiver! The experiences German artist Carsten Holler is offering at the New Museum, starting today, include a ride down his engineered slide, Experience Corridor, (made-way for by…

(Source: artelierllc)

Graphic Intervention: 25 Years of International AIDS Posters

At the Atlanta Museum of Design Oct 2, 2011 - Jan 1, 2012, I’d love to see this exhib:

Graphic Intervention presents a comprehensive overview of the diverse visual strategies employed by government agencies, community activists, grassroots organizations and motivated citizens to educate the local population.

Figure in the Garden, NY MoMA

Katharina Fritsch. <i>Figurengruppe.</i> 200608 (fabricated 201011). Bronze, copper, and stainless steel, lacquered, dimensions variable. Gift of Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann (Laurenz Foundation). © 2011 Katharina Fritsch

Katharina Fritsch. Figurengruppe. 2006–08 (fabricated 2010–11). Bronze, copper, and stainless steel, lacquered

The work features nine life-size sculptures of, among other figures, St. Michael, a Madonna, a giant, and a snake, all rendered in precise detail and finished in bold colors. Religious symbolism and references to mythology abound, yet any fixed meaning remains open and elusive.

More info HERE and HERE.

Diane Arbus @ the Jeu de Paume, Paris

Another exhib I am dying to see, October 18, 2011 – February 5, 2012

Child with a toy hand grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C. 1962, Silver gelatin print

Diane Arbus (New York, 1923–1971) revolutionized the art she practiced. Her bold subject matter and photographic approach produced a body of work that is often shocking in its purity, in its steadfast celebration of things as they are. Her gift for rendering strange those things we consider most familiar, and for uncovering the familiar within the exotic, enlarges our understanding of ourselves.

Arbus found most of her subjects in New York City, a place that she explored as both a known geography and as a foreign land, photographing people she discovered during the 1950s and 1960s. She was committed to photography as a medium that tangles with the facts. Her contemporary anthropology—portraits of couples, children, carnival performers, nudists, middle-class families, transvestites, zealots, eccentrics, and celebrities—stands as an allegory of the human experience, an exploration of the relationship between appearance and identity, illusion and belief, theater and reality.

In this first major retrospective in France, Jeu de Paume presents a selection of two hundred photographs that affords an opportunity to explore the origins, scope, and aspirations of a wholly original force in photography. It includes all of the artist’s iconic photographs as well as many that have never been publicly exhibited. Even the earliest examples of her work demonstrate Arbus’s distinctive sensibility through the expression on a face, someone’s posture, the character of the light, and the personal implications of objects in a room or landscape. These elements, animated by the singular relationship between the photographer and her subject, conspire to implicate the viewer with the force of a personal encounter.

More info HERE.

Cy Twombly: Sculpture @ NY MoMA Through Oct 3

Cy Twombly. Untitled (<i>Funerary Box for a Lime Green Python</i>). 1954. Wood, palm leaf fans, house paint, cloth, and wire. 55 x 26 1/4 x 5" (140 x 66 x 12.5 cm). Promised gift of Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis. © Cy Twombly. Courtesy Gagosian Gallery. Photography by Robert McKeever

Untitled (Funerary Box for a Lime Green Python). 1954. Wood, palm leaf fans, house paint, cloth, and wire. 55 x 26 1/4 x 5” (140 x 66 x 12.5 cm)

More info HERE

Though best known for his paintings, Twombly has dedicated himself to making sculptures throughout his 60-year career. He composes his sculptures from found materials, small objects, scrap wood, and plaster, and typically covers the assembled forms with white paint, unifying the various humble materials and giving them an ethereal presence. Intimate in scale, Twombly’s sculptures engage in an ongoing dialogue with his paintings, several of which are also on view in the newly reinstalled fourth-floor collection galleries.

RELATED: Cy Twombly Dies

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